Senate Republicans intoduce a bill to pre-empt EFCA

Senate Republican have introduced a bill to pre-empt EFCA and preserve the right of employees to secret ballot elections.  As reported by BNA’s Daily Labor Report on February 26, 2009:

Congressional Republicans Feb. 25 announced introduction of legislation in the House and Senate, named the Secret Ballot Protection Act (bill numbers not available yet), that would ensure employees in union organizing campaigns the right to a secret ballot election conducted by the National Labor Relations Board.
The legislation is a preemptive strike against the Employee Free Choice Act that Democrats are expected to introduce soon, Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), and Reps. Howard P. “Buck” McKeon (R-Calif.), John Kline (R-Minn.), and Tom Price, (R-Ga.) said at a press conference announcing the bill. Declaring that a secret ballot is a fundamental employee right, they said EFCA would deny workers that right and create a climate of intimidation during union organizing campaigns.

“Secret ballots are a hallmark of American Democracy. They protect individuals-whether they are voters on election day or workers deciding whether to organize-from public pressure, intimidation, or post-vote retribution,” McKeon said.

The bill would amend the National Labor Relations Act to make it an unfair labor practice for an employer to recognize or bargain with a union that has not been selected by a majority of employees in a secret ballot election conducted by NLRB. The bill also would make it an unfair labor practice for a union to cause or attempt to cause an employer to recognize or bargain with a union that has not been selected by a majority of employees in a secret ballot NLRB election.

Kline and Price, the ranking Republicans on House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions and the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections, respectively, and McKeon, ranking member on the House Education and Labor Committee, introduced the bill. DeMint, and Sen. Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.), ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, introduced the companion bill in the Senate.

The bill has 101 co-sponsors in the House and 16 co-sponsors in the Senate.

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